Shopify Import

Shopify Import

Import your store data from Shopify

Pull shop data into Parabola from Shopify

Using the Shopify Import, you can pull in the following data:

Authorizing

To start, you will need your Shopify shop URL. Take a look at your Shopify store, and you may see something like this: awesome-socks.myshopfy.com - from that you would just need to copy awesome-socks to put into the first authorization prompt:

After that, you will be shown a window from Shopify, asking for you to authorize Parabola to access your Shopify store. If you have done this before, and/or if you are logged into Shopify in your browser, this step may be done automatically.

After that is done, you can select what data to import!

You can have as many separate Shopify accounts authorized in a single flow as you need, and each Shopify Import can pull from whichever auth you want, allowing you to pull data from across many different accounts if needed!

You can edit your authorizations at any time by doing the following:

The Edit Accounts menu is also how you can switch which account a step is pulling from.

Importing your Shop Balance

This is a simple option that pulls in 1 row, containing the balance of your shop, and the currency that it is set to.

Importing your Customers

This option will pull in 1 row for every customer that you have in your Shopify store records. The default columns will only pull in the default address for each customer. Because customers may have more than one address, you can elect to also import any additional addresses. If you choose to import these additional addresses, any customer with more than a single address will show up on multiple rows. For example, if your customer Juanita has 3 addresses in your system, then you will see 3 rows for Juanita, with the address information being the only data that is different for each of her rows.

Importing your Locations

This is a simple option that will pull in all of your locations for this shop. The data is formatted as one row per location.

Importing your Orders

Shopify orders contain all of the information about each order that your shop has received. You can see totals associated with an order, as well as customer information, and more. The default settings will pull in any order that happened in the last day. If you need more granular information about what products were sold, fulfilled, or returned, see the Line Items option.

You can choose to toggle between the default columns, which is a list of columns that most use cases use, and all columns, which included every field that your orders contain.

Filtering the data

Your orders can be filtered before they are imported. They can be filtered by their status, financial status, or fulfillment status. These fields default to any, but you can change them to only pull a certain type of order.

You can also use the processed at date to filter what timeframe to pull your orders from. The date filtering has the following options:

All of these dates can set with a timezone as well.

The is within the last this is a rolling window, and it can be set to be the time calculated at the time the flow runs (or while building), or it can be calculated as the last complete unit that you chose. So if have it set to the last 1 week of data, and your flow runs on Wednesday, then it can either be set to pull last Wednesday until now, or it can be set to pull from two Sundays ago to this last Sunday, since that is the last complete week available.

Importing your Disputes

Retrieve all disputes ordered by the date when it was initiated, with the most recent being first. Disputes occur when a buyer questions the legitimacy of a charge with their financial institution. Each row will represent 1 dispute.

Importing your Product Inventory Levels

An inventory level represents the available quantity of an inventory item at a specific location.

Each inventory level belongs to one inventory item and has one location. For every location where an inventory item is available, there's an inventory level that represents the inventory item's quantity at that location.

You can choose any combination of locations to pull the inventory levels for, but you must choose at least one. Each row will contain a product that exists in a location, along with its quantity.

Importing your Line Items, with refunds and fulfillments

Each order placed with your shop contains line items - products that were purchased. Each order could have many line items included in it. Each row of imported data will represent a single item from an order, so you may see that orders span across many rows, since they may have many line items.

There are 4 types of columns that show up in this import: Orders, Line Items, Refunds, and Fulfillment columns. When looking a single line item (a single row), you can scroll left and right to se information about the line item, about its parent order, refund information if it was refunded, and fulfillment information if that line itemwas fulfilled.

Choose to toggle between the default columns, which is a list of columns that most use cases use, and all columns, which included every field that your orders contain.

You can use the same filtering described above in the Orders option to filter down the line items from which order are imported at a time.

Filtering the data

Your line items can be filtered before they are imported. They can be filtered by their parent order's status, financial status, or fulfillment status. These fields default to any, but you can change them to only pull a certain type of order's line items.

You can also use the processed at date to filter what timeframe to pull your orders' line items from. The date filtering has the following options:

All of these dates can set with a timezone as well.

The is within the last this is a rolling window, and it can be set to be the time calculated at the time the flow runs (or while building), or it can be calculated as the last complete unit that you chose. So if have it set to the last 1 week of data, and your flow runs on Wednesday, then it can either be set to pull last Wednesday until now, or it can be set to pull from two Sundays ago to this last Sunday, since that is the last complete week available.

Importing your Discounts

Every order the passes through your shop may have some discounts associated with it. A shopper may use a few discount codes on their order. Since each order can have any number discount codes applied to it, each row in this import represents a discount applied to an order. Orders may not show up in this table if they have none, or they may show up a few times! There are columns referring to information about the order, and columns referring to information about the discount that was applied.

Importing your Shipping Lines

As your orders are fulfilled, shipments are created and sent out. Each shipment for an order is represented as a row in this import. Because an order may be spread across a few shipments, each order may show up more than one time in this import. There are columns referring to information about the order, and columns referring to information about the shipment that the row represents.

Importing your Payouts

Payouts represent the movement of money between a Shopify Payments account balance and a connected bank account. You can use this import option to pull a list of those payouts, with each row representing a single payout.

Importing your Products

This import pulls in a list of your products. Because a product can have any number of variants, each row in this import represents a variant of a product. Because of this, you may see that a product is repeated across many rows, with one row for each of its variants. When you set up a product, it is created as a variant, so products cannot exist without having at least one variant, even if it is the only one.

You can filter down your products by a few attributes to get a more focussed list imported.

If you choose to include the images in your import, your row structure may changes. A product variant may have many images, and when you import them, each image will be added to a new row, so product variant XYZ may show up on 3 rows if there are 3 images imported for it.

Importing your Product-Collection Relationships

Products can exist in collections - the first one that you start with is the homepage collection. These collections are a great way to organize your products and display them in your shop. This import pulls in the relationships. You will see that each row contains a Product ID and a Collection ID, which tells you which collections that product belongs to. Because a product can exist in many collections, and each collection can have many products, you will see that the rows are unique to each combination of product and collection, but individual product or collection IDs may exist across many rows.

Importing your Custom Product Collections

Import the name and details of your product collections, which can be used alongside the product-collection relationships import to view exactly which products exist in which collection.

Each row represents the details of a custom collection of products.

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